The Quiet People (25th November 2021)

(1 customer review)

£8.99

Cameron and Lisa Murdoch are successful New Zealand crime writers, happily married and topping bestseller lists worldwide. They have been on the promotional circuit for years, joking that no one knows how to get away with crime like they do.

After all, they write about it for a living. So when their challenging seven-year-old son Zach disappears, the police and the public naturally wonder if they have finally decided to prove what they have been saying all this time… Are they trying to show how they can commit the perfect crime?

 

 

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Description

Suspicion is cast on two successful crime writers, when their seven-year-old son goes missing. Are they trying to show that they can commit the perfect crime?

A mesmerisingly twisty, dark thriller from number-one bestselling author Paul Cleave…

‘A cinematic, raging, rollercoaster of a plot with a wry humour … The Quiet People is wildly entertaining and will keep you guessing right to the end’ New Zealand Herald

‘A superb novel from a champion storyteller’ Crime Watch

‘Cleave writes the kind of dark, intense thrillers that I never want to end. Do yourself a favour and check him out’ Simon Kernick

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Cameron and Lisa Murdoch are successful New Zealand crime writers, happily married and topping bestseller lists worldwide. They have been on the promotional circuit for years, joking that no one knows how to get away with crime like they do.

After all, they write about it for a living. So when their challenging seven-year-old son Zach disappears, the police and the public naturally wonder if they have finally decided to prove what they have been saying all this time… Are they trying to show how they can commit the perfect crime?

 

 

Additional information

Weight 0.5 kg
ISBN

9781913193942

Author

Cleave, Paul

Publisher

Orenda Books

Binding

Paperback

1 review for The Quiet People (25th November 2021)

  1. Carly Brown

    [Condensed Review]
    Rating: 3.5/5 stars rounded down

    Husband and wife duo Cameron and Lisa Murdoch are successful co-authors of crime novels. Financially comfortable, all seems well in their lives with their 7-year-old son, Zach, in Christchurch, New Zealand. But the morning after Cameron and Zach have a difficult trip to the funfair, the Murdochs wake to discover Zach has vanished from his bed. During the frantic race against time to find him it doesn’t take long for the media, the public and the police to stop wondering whether Zach ran away or was abducted, and start suspecting the crime-writing couple of having brought their “twisted” fiction to life.

    I switched my rating between 3 and 4 stars four times!

    Firstly, I *really* wish I had annotated this novel as I read it! I may return to it one day to pick out the themes I wanted to ponder on more. It made my brain whirl thinking about how we react to news (both personal and public) before really examining or digesting it, about how we think of and treat parents in cases of missing children, about understanding those we believe to be on the ‘wrong side’ and about forgiveness of those who wrong us, even in the most unthinkable circumstances.

    The first third of The Quiet People is a real slow burn and Cameron’s character is self-pitying and self-absorbed from the beginning, so I had to work hard to soldier on. I questioned the inclusion of some seemingly inconsequential details and the plausibility of the storyline. It felt self-indulgent and overly meta on Cleave’s part, the fact of the couple being crime writers given way more importance than I believe it would have in real life. But as the story progressed I found myself questioning whether that was too judgemental and presumptive of me, akin to the spectators who had made up their minds about the Murdochs based on a few snippets.

    I would have liked to have seen much more of the dynamics of Cameron and Lisa’s relationship prior to Zach’s disappearance as well as much more of Lisa’s backstory and character development. Despite being a pivotal character, she was, by and large, absent throughout the majority of the book.

    It made for disquieting reading in places and it was difficult not to question how much real life the author was injecting into it, although I think this was an intended, tongue-in-cheek layer.

    Ultimately, I did enjoy the pacing and the red herrings and felt mostly satisfied with the ending. All of the threads become neatly woven together by the end and I appreciated the careful placement of foreshadowing elements when connecting things back over earlier chapters.

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